Course

Upstream Fish Passage


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Emphasis will be placed on fish behavior and its role in site selection and other fishway features. In addition, this course will cover the need for fishways, the obstacles posing an impediment to their construction, and the different types of "exclusion barriers" (barriers designed for management purposes) that are currently being used. Different types of fish ladders, lifts, and locks will be described with discussion of features and design criteria. Participants will benefit from a fishway design exercise, paired with a discussion of common operation and maintenance challenges.
Course Title: Upstream Fish Passage
Course ID: BIO-306
Status: OPEN
Date(s): April 12, 2021: 8:30am - 4:30pm
April 13, 2021: 8:30am - 4:30pm
Location: Live Remote Attendance-- USA

Live Remote Attendance, WA
Instructors: Dr. Joseph E. Merz
Dr. Rocko A. Brown
Tuition: $695 / $645*
$645 / $595* (Before March 12, 2021)

 

Description:

**Note - For every course we have implemented live stream remote attendance options for those who prefer a no-contact alternative to in-person attendance.  You will need a computer and an internet connection.  We will follow the maximum in-person meeting size as per health authorities and if recommended we will only offer remote attendance.

If conditions permit, you are welcome to attend the course in-person, we likely will have between 5 to 10 in-person attendee's in a large room to provide safe spacing.  We also wipe every surface down and provide hand washing and disinfectant wipes as a courtesy.  If you would like more information or have any questions, please contact us via email or phone 425 270 3274.

 

This course will take a multidisciplinary approach to fish passage design development processes, focusing on practices established in the Pacific Northwest over the last 30 years. Emphasis will be placed on fish behavior and its role in site selection and other fishway features. In addition, this course will cover the need for fishways, the obstacles posing an impediment to their construction, and the different types of “exclusion barriers” (barriers designed for management purposes) that are currently being used. Different types of fish ladders, lifts, and locks will be described with discussion of features and design criteria. Participants will benefit from a fishway design exercise, paired with a discussion of common operation and maintenance challenges. General graphics and facility photos will augment discussions.

Course includes touring nearby fish passage facilities and, in some cases, sampling fish processed by facilities. This tour allows for fishways and design principles covered in class to be observed in full operation, including a trap where salmon are being diverted into sample facilities for processing by local biologists.

Intended Audience: This class is tailored for engineers, biologists, managers, and those interested in fish passage.

Course Materials: Attendees will receive a binder containing workshop proceedings and reference material.

Continuing Education Units: 1.3 CEUs

*Reduced tuition is available to employees of Native American tribes, government agencies, and nonprofits; students; and NAEP members.

If you have any difficulties or questions regarding registration please call 425-270-3274

Please wait to receive a course confirmation email, roughly one month prior to the class, before making any travel arrangements.

 

Intended Audience:

Continuing Education Units: CEUs

More Information

Course Topics

Fish Behavior (in the context of fish passage)
Impediments
Preliminary Design Data Needs
Fish Ladder Design Types and Features
Exclusion Barriers
Fish Traps
Fishway Design Exercise
Common Problems

About the Instructors

Dr. Joseph E. Merz

Dr. Joseph E. Merz

Dr. Merz is a registered scientist with the American Fisheries Society. He has over 20 years of experience working with aquatic resources and has been the principal scientist on several salmonid habitat restoration programs in the California Central Valley. He has taught environmental science, salmon biology and restoration courses for the past fourteen years.

Joe is known for his work with human and fisheries habitat interactions, and for his ability to communicate with scientific and stakeholder audiences alike. He has earned degrees in Environmental and Systematic Biology (Bachelors), Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo (1991); Biological Conservation (Masters), California State University, Sacramento (1994); and Conservation Ecology (Ph.D.), University of California, Davis (2004).

Dr. Merz has worked for California public, provide and non-profit entities on resource monitoring and fisheries habitat enhancement. He is noted as an environmental studies and natural resources lecturer, and for his successes working with stakeholders. He has coauthored a variety of peer-reviewed publications*, focusing on river rehabilitation, fish movement, invasive species, woody debris/redd associations, and evaluation of spawning habitat enhancement, among others. In line with his professional interests, he is a member of the Ecological Society of America, the American Fisheries Society and the Southwestern Association of Naturalists.  Dr. Merz has been honored with a variety of awards and has received research and restoration grants from multiple stakeholders for restoration related projects in California, Oregon and Washington for salmonid habitat restoration; salmonid management and reintroduction; monitoring of fish migration and movement; fish passage improvement; and assessment of invasive species interactions with native salmonid populations.

Dr. Rocko A. Brown

Dr. Rocko A. Brown

Dr. Rocko Brown is an expert design geomorphologist who uniquely balances applied and scientific aspects of geomorphology and engineering. He focuses on process-based assessment and restoration of fisheries resources through channel manipulation integrating geomorphic, hydraulic and ecological frameworks. He has extensive experience in hydraulic and sediment transport modeling and design for fish passage improvements, channel design, large wood and instream habitat structures, and bank stabilization.

Rocko has led the design of seasonal floodplain, spawning habitat, and fish passage projects in a diverse array of physical and regulatory settings. He has made contributions to spawning habitat rehabilitation efforts, including assessment, modeling, design and construction of projects on several of California’s most-important rivers. Dr. Brown has published heavily on evaluating the interactions of topography and flow hydrology for geomorphic processes needed for salmonids to complete their life cycle and how to design functional riverscapes that honor these linkages. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering from Temple University and Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Hydrologic Sciences from the University of California, Davis. He has been an instructor with NWETC since 2009.

What to Bring

Classroom Day (Day 1): Pen or pencil, notepad, coffee mug, and a water bottle (to reduce waste). Coffee, tea, breakfast pastries, drinks and snacks will be provided each day. Lunch on your own.

Field Day (Day 2): Please wear comfortable clothes appropriate for the prevailing weather and for working in the field. Lunch will be provided for each student.

Billing Information

In order to guarantee a space in a course, the tuition must be paid in full TWO WEEKS before the first day of the course by either check or credit card. State and government agencies paying with a purchase order are allowed payment under the two-week time frame if a copy of the purchase order is received by NWETC.

If You Need to Cancel

Cancellations*

  • With 31 or more days notice, we will offer a 100% refund or credit towards a future course. The credit is good for one year and may be applied to any course.
  • With 30-8 days notice, we will offer a course credit towards a future course. The credit is good for one year and may be applied to any course.
  • With fewer than 8 days notice, there is no course credit available


*Please note that attendee replacement is welcome at any time

Disability Accommodations

Disability Accommodations:

To request disability accommodations, please contact us at info@nwetc.org or 425-270-3274 at least 30 days prior to the event.


Directions

  • From:

  • To:
  •   Live Remote Attendance-- USA Live Remote Attendance, WA TBD

Accommodations

 



*Reduced tuition available to employees of Native American tribes, nonprofits, and government agencies; students; and NAEP members.

If you have any trouble registering please call (425) 270-3274 ext 103
Please wait to receive a course confirmation email, roughly one month prior to the class, before making any travel arrangements. Please review what to bring!

 

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